medievalpoc:

blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

Before There Was Mozart: The Story of Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-George

Lesa Cline-Ransome

Joseph Boulogne loved music. The singing of the birds, the beat of drums, the peal of church bells—and most of all, the soaring notes of his violin. But as the son of a white plantation owner and a black slave, newly arrived in France from the West Indies, what chance did Joseph have for success with his music? Here is the true story of an extraordinary boy who overcame the prejudices of his peers to become one of the finest classical musicians in all of Europe.

Author’s Photo

It’s good to know someone made a book based on his life! I have posts here and here on Chevalier Saint-Georges Boulogne, and here is a portrait of him as an adult:

image

(via stillstealing)

The fact is, a 14-year-old girl may be capable of agreeing to sex with a 49-year-old man, but she doesn’t have the emotional and mental maturity to consent. I was 25 before I realized that every man I’d slept with as a teenager was a pedophile. It seemed to me that since I’d courted the attention, that I was fully culpable. What teenager believes she is not mentally or emotionally capable of full consent? I thought I was an adult, although when I look at the picture of myself from the time period above, I see a child.

I thought I was the exception for these men, the girl so precocious and advanced that it superseded social norms. I thought that I was “older than my chronological age.”

It never occurred to me as a young sexually active teen that the adult men I had relationships with may have been manipulating me, that they had designs and motives I couldn’t see from my limited child’s perspective.

Emily, XOJANE, "The Myth of the Teenage Temptress, or Why a Young Girl Can Not Consent to Sex with an Adult Man"

Everyone should read this article if they haven’t already. The anecdotes are upsetting and carry major TW (pedophilia, graphic depictions of sex), but the message is just so on point. 

(via graculus)

(Source: owning-my-truth, via decolonizeyourmind)

It’s lovely that Robin Thicke thinks his marriage is worth saving, but this is not the way to go about it. This entire album, the track names, the hashtag; if this is in fact a sincere effort to “get her back” it’s basically a how-to on abuser dynamics. Rather than allowing Patton the time and space to decide whether or not to reconcile in private, with this album, Thicke has effectively enlisted the public to get on his side and pressure her into going back to him, and make her the villain if she refuses. “Oh, but he wrote a whole album about her! He’s really sorry!” All while he rakes in the cash, and she loses her resolve to stay away from a man who cheated on her, publicly embarrassed her and ruined a decades long relationship.

aloofshahbanou:

Men who do not lift a single finger yet freely consume and critique the meals I prepare are not welcome in my kitchen

doctorsilencewillfall:

twentyonee-pilots:

do me a favour. if a person wearing a long sleeved shirt or a sweatshirt and jeans on a hot day, don’t comment on it. don’t ask why they’re wearing it. don’t say anything at about it.

trust me, they know it’s hot, they know. but their reason for wearing what they’re wearing probably far outweighs the temperature outside.

this is so god damn important

(via stayuglystayangry)

Being a woman is kind of like being a cyclist in a city where all the cars represent men. You’re supposed to be able to share the road equally with cars, but that’s not how it works. The roads are built for cars and you spend a great deal of physical and mental energy being defensive and trying not to get hurt. Some of the cars WANT you to get hurt. They think you don’t have any place on the road at all. And if you do get hurt by a car, everyone makes excuses that it’s your fault.
A friend of a friend (via onesmallflowerofeternity)

(via recreationalsociologist)

Gentrifiers focus on aesthetics, not people. Because people, to them, are aesthetics.

Proponents of gentrification will vouch for its benevolence by noting it “cleaned up the neighbourhood”. This is often code for a literal white-washing. The problems that existed in the neighbourhood - poverty, lack of opportunity, struggling populations denied city services - did not go away. They were simply priced out to a new location.

That new location is often an impoverished suburb, which lacks the glamour to make it the object of future renewal efforts. There is no history to attract preservationists because there is nothing in poor suburbs viewed as worth preserving, including the futures of the people forced to live in them. This is blight without beauty, ruin without romance: payday loan stores, dollar stores, unassuming homes and unpaid bills. In the suburbs, poverty looks banal and is overlooked.

In cities, gentrifiers have the political clout - and accompanying racial privilege - to reallocate resources and repair infrastructure. The neighbourhood is “cleaned up” through the removal of its residents. Gentrifiers can then bask in “urban life” - the storied history, the selective nostalgia, the carefully sprinkled grit - while avoiding responsibility to those they displaced.

Sarah Kendzior - The peril of hipster economics (x)

(Source: mizoguchi, via recreationalsociologist)

Tampons were packed with their strings connecting them, like a strip of sausages, so they wouldn’t float away. Engineers asked Ride, “Is 100 the right number?” She would be in space for a week. “That would not be the right number,” she told them. At every turn, her difference was made clear to her. When it was announced Ride had been named to a space flight mission, her shuttle commander, Bob Crippen, who became a lifelong friend and colleague, introduced her as “undoubtedly the prettiest member of the crew.” At another press event, a reporter asked Ride how she would react to a problem on the shuttle: “Do you weep?”

Astronaut Sally Ride and the Burden of Being “The First” (via yahighway)

Whereas, my response to all that probably would have been more like “YOU ALL. YOU DON’T EVEN KNOW WHAT YOU’RE IN FOR, YO.”

Which is likely why I was not the first woman in space. Or in space at all, actually.

(via veronica-rich)

Men don’t appreciate the amount of self-control women have to exercise in order not to spend their entire lives face-palming.

(via beckyblackbooks)

"Will 100 tampons be enough for a week?"

"Depends. How many do you plan on using?"

I would genuinely like to meet the engineer who believes that someone who has a period uses, at the very least, fourteen tampons a day.

(via everythingsbetterwithbisexuals)

(Source: dinosaurparty, via wretchedoftheearth)

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

kungfucarrie:

The most dangerous phrase in the language is, “we’ve always done it this way.”

(Source: uvmsemba, via wontbetelevised)

exghoulfriend:

it is crucial to believe and respect girls when they say a guy is giving them bad vibes even if they don’t give you a reason why

(via creepingfeminism)